8 Sep 2014

Mod Eagle

1932 Adler Mod. 32 431224











I tried cleaning the plastic panel inside as best I could, but two of the screws were the most impossible ones I've tried to unscrew! They're a bit mangled so somebody has tried before. 2 applications of liquid wrench haven't helped.

This Adler is actually a Triumph in disguise. It has a separate serial number series from the Triumphs, and I believe it was manufactured by Adler with the Triumph design, rather than being made by Triumph and badged as an Adler. Either way, this body style is specific to Adler.







Better than a Corona Four, but not necessarily better than a Royal Model OT or Underwood Portable.

Sent from my new Adler Mod. 32

(saying "Mod. 32" is just too fun not to.)

7 comments:

  1. Neat! Especially that back panel.

    I have a later version, where the front panel is actually bakelite-ish plastic. Must post about it sometime.

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  2. German ebay again! I had heard that this machine is a bit poor to use, but it was Adler's first type bar machine after all. Still, it has a lot of charm.

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    1. Actually this was on US ebay! It didn't attract much attention and I got it for perhaps even less than I would have paid to get it from Germany.

      Now I have to wonder if the corresponding 1932 Triumph portable was better to use that this.

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  3. Very interesting logo. The eagle looks like a W, like the one we also know from Wanderer Werke. The circle with the 'x' in it, actually looks like a hidden swastika. The 'x' leans back with the same angle. And then the lightning bolts. I've got the feeling there's some hidden propaganda in this one! But as a major car manufacturer (3th in place during those times) you of course have to do something to stay in business...

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    1. BTW, you can expect as story on this by a week or so.

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    2. I doubt about the swastika part, since the Nazi party hadn't come to any major power until two years later. I thought about that myself briefly, but at that point in history I think this would be very unlikely.

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    3. The use in the People's Car logo was a lot later, and directly related to the involvement of the government in the production of the car, whereas this was much earlier and the Adler company wasn't involved, to my knowledge, in any such things. Nazi symbolism really wasn't used in any other typewriter logo designs throughout the following years, except perhaps the DM versions of Olympias…

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