29 Sep 2014

Golden Era

1978 Erika 105 5798745













The weird thing about what happened in the 1970s is that a quick look between a pre- and post-change Erika doesn't reveal anything that would explain why the typing action improved so dramatically. I intent do some day look deeper into this mystery.

I've also been keeping my two Erika history posts updated with any new information I get or things I figure out. If you haven't look at those posts before, they will explain some of the things I said in the typecast. Post-war Erikas (part 1, 1946-1965) - Post-war Erikas (part 2, 1965-1991)

Sent from my new Erika 105

10 comments:

  1. I totally agree about the comparative quality of these typewriters. Mine's a white one (1981) I was going to sell it until I typed on it and realised it's a keeper (at least until I find a better one from what you call the first golden age). The 1950s on through the early 60s was also a golden age for jazz music - which I like to collect too!

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    1. Every once in a while I feel like I should check my enthusiasm for them, after all, most late-50s early-60s German typewriters are better. But for the 70s and 80s, I always come back to these Erikas.

      You could always keep both! ;) They are quite different typewriters representing two different eras and designs.

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  2. I have admired the 105 in photos, but have never seen one in person. I am told they are big machines. Can you gives dimensions, including weight so one can compare the 105 with other big to biggish portables, such as the Erika 10 or the Torpedo 18?

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    1. It's slightly larger in width than the Torpedo 18 and in height compared to the Erika 10, though a bit lighter due to the plastic body. 13" x 12" x 5" dimensions and 11 lbs weight.

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  3. That's nice for a 70's machine. You're the brand ambassador for Erika aren't you?

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    1. Every typewriter brand needs its ambassador for the 21st century!

      I didn't have time to bring it out to the table at the type-out, although it was with me in the Subaru.

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  4. I love Erika's but never really fell in love with these later models, Daro especially. Maybe it's the steep rows of keys. Can't get use to them. Your pictures are improving though! Finally found that light spot you were searching for?

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    1. I think the later 70s and newer models, regardless of the manufacturer, are appealing to only some people.

      Turns out the best place is actually where I take my normal pictures! Although I used a bit of photoshop for these.

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  5. Have never seen or used an Erika in person, but am now curious! As usual, your text is well conceived, and the photography artful, and clear. Thanks for your first class work
    Just picked up an Olympia SM-3 from 1961..... what a great unit, as opposed to the SM-9s, I think, that some people rave about. The SM-9s I find completely over rated, especially now that I've typed on an SM-3 which is so much smoother and well constructed--- solid and real.

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    1. These later Erikas probably wouldn't be your thing, but an Erika 10—one of the most solid typewriters out there!

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