19 Jul 2014

An old story and a new Torpedo

1951 Torpedo 18b 570772








the back piece of the carriage was missing, so I replaced it with black cardstock,
inspired by notagain's makeshift ribbon cover










Sent from my new Torpedo 18b

18 comments:

  1. Well, it looks like you have a real Torpedo addiction on your hands, not to mention an intriguing machine! What person would purchase an American layout machine in Germany? A fleeing German emigrant? A US soldier stationed overseas? A tourist or traveling businessman with a taste for german craftsmanship? Very interesting...

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    1. The obsession has been with me for a long time… helped by a stunning array of colors, designs, and typefaces over the years.

      Buying that Torpedo was certainly one of their best decisions in life, I'd say. For the era, the glass keys were archaic, but looking back it's so much more attractive than a 1951 Smith-Corona Silent! Not to mention how it's superior to the US-made machines of that time.

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  2. What a great line of typewriters. I envy your chance to meet Mr. Montgomery.

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  3. If I could pick one from your collection, that'd be the one! Perfect.

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    1. ... from your collection of Torpedos I mean.

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  4. Nice looking machine. Indeed the paint works on this one - the other one I liked in this paint was your long gone Corona Comet. Did you take the machine to the shooting range to confirm the statement about the case?

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    1. No, although in 2011 I did take a useless broken Quiet-Riter out on the range… ;) http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-HCFFlt0jQeo/TdAAxCrOmkI/AAAAAAAAAJc/A0ES5HEjSUs/s1600/Phlsphthght-35-4-11-05-15.jpg

      Though most of the damage is actually from throwing it repeatedly into the driveway. Typewriters are just too tough.

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  5. Nick, I enjoyed the photos of Mr.Montgomery and his well-organized workshop as much as those of your stunning new Torpedo.One can only hope that an apprentice is in training to pick up when he passes on.

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    1. No apprentices are training—in fact, I don't think there are any young people training full time under a typewriter repair person. (I know of at least one person who's in their 40s though) Scott and I were discussing this, and all signs are leading towards in the next 20 years serious collector-users becoming collector-user-mechanics, as self-sufficient as possible in repairing, with the collective mental resources of the typosphere. It is sad to loose the repair shops we have…but unless I'm wrong, there aren't many people ready to take the mantle.

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    2. This is true here too, Bill at MTE has a son, but with no interest in being the 4th of the Wahl generations to run the shop. Luckily Bill's young and very fit. He should last a long while.

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  6. Nice looking typewriter and a great collection. Truly love Mr. Montgomery's shop. He is one of the few repair shops leftr. I would love to have a shop like that.

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    1. So many tools! It was crazy seeing the tools Remington made for working on the Noiseless standard… the designers made it about as difficult as possible to reach certain adjustment points and had to make tools with handles that bend around 270º to get to them!

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    2. so many books on his shelf. I wonder if he has factory serial number lists for the brands he dealt? I always look at the pictures of shelves in out-of-state typewriter shops and wonder what gems are hidden in there...

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    3. His father was primarily an Underwood dealer, I'm not sure if they sold any other brands in large quantities. He has travelled around a lot though, so I wonder what might be there.

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  7. This is a very cool post! Isn't he an interesting guy?
    We should have a type-out soon.

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    1. He is indeed!

      We should, I've had thoughts of one in Wright, or Fireman's Park, I always love the view from there and how it's a bit out of the way.

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  8. Great chance Nick! I imagine you will return to Mr. Montgomery more often now? His shop looks very neat and tidy for a work environment. Or is it just this picture?

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    1. Haha, you guessed. It's quite a messy place actually. An old friend friend would have called it an organized mess, Mr Montgomery can find anything he wants easily, but to a visitor it looks hopelessly confusing. I suppose you might say that my own typewriter workspace looks like that, except I don't have many tools. XD

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