4 Jun 2013

Mystery Solved! The Frozen Facit (Starring Facit 1620)

1970s Facit 1620 P620612














Ribbon Advance: Use it just at the tip

Ribbon Advance: Apply it at the point where the pin meets the disk. It will seep through.

Escapement wheel: Remove the type guide.
Escapement wheel: Apply right in between it and the carriage rail above.

Escapement wheel: Remove the perforated bottom cover.

Escapement wheel: Apply a generous amount inside the hole in the wheel.


I'm really hoping this can become a significant contribution for the good of all Facits, especially because as I've found it might actually happen to you after you've owned one for a while.

Typed rather triumphantly on my new Facit 1620.

*Ignore that I accidentally post-dated this... haha

17 comments:

  1. Good troubleshooting!

    I haven't tried a 1620 but I'm impressed with my TP1.

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    1. It was fun! And it's the best when you can say that you fixed one of your favourite typewriters.

      It would be pretty hard to beat this design, but I'm hoping that the TP1 beat it. But I really have to idea what to expect, considering this is probably an improved design and doesn't appear to have any cost-cutting.

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  2. I have the same problem. Thanks I will try this. I just found my can of PB Blaster.

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    1. Let me know if it works! I don't want to be spreading terrible lies. >.>

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  3. I'm a h7uge believer in the 80% Deep Clean Philosophy -- 80% of basic typewriter issues are resolved with a good deep clean. Goo Gone is amazing stuff, if you can get past the odor. I've also used nearly-pure alcohol from the pharmacy to de-gunk. Congrats on restoring a fine machine, and in giving me a new model to hunt for!

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    1. Pure alcohol probably would be a little better for it, but I haven't had any problems with Goo Gone in all my typewriting years.

      Thanks! And good luck! I wish I could say they were more common.

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    2. There's always EverClear, if you have any left over after making the punch.

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  4. Well done Nick. I covet thy Facit's monorail. Close-ups show a fair amount of sibling similarity with my new old Halda.

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    1. Sometimes I just get the thing out and objectify it.

      I'm a bit surprised! I had thought this was a completely different design at this point.

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  5. Congratulations! Good work. The 1620 looks like a very nice typewriter. I have had one on my wish list ever since reading Robert Messenger's review of them.

    I think Goo Gone has naptha in it which leads me to believe any thin oil or perhaps kerosene may also work. I'd stay away from alcohol around lubricants. Petroleum based solvents penetrating oil (not WD-40) or thin oils would be better. Nothing wrong with Goo Gone. You may have discovered a good use for it. Time will tell.

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    1. It still works beautifully the next morning, so there's one small assurance!

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  6. Brilliant. Nice post. Clean looking typeface, though the numerals are a little angular.

    ALG

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  7. Not only was my recently-acquired Facit 1620 frozen as solid as a Swedish pond in January, but it also had a wonky space bar. Your blog post set me in the right direction to free that escapement wheel with Goo Gone and Kroil, during which I was also able to set the space bar linkage right. It took an overnight soak with the solvents, plus some gentle persuasion with a nail set and a mallet to get the wheel to move at all, then gently back and forth, and finally it freed up completely. Thanks to your help, a very fine machine is now doing just fine, and saved from the junk pile.

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    1. I think, after using both of my Facits for months after unfreezing them, that an overnight soak in solvents probably would be the only real answer to a complete fix, but I'm too timid to try it out on machines I love so much! (I unfortunately have to re-apply goo gone or liquid wrench every other month or so to the points to keep it working well.)

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    2. Ah, I see now reading your post what you meant by an overnight soak. I thought you meant actually submerging the machine which certainly would be a delicate task.

      Therefore, you may have to re-apply solvents in the next few months (especially if you don't type regularly on it). I have so many typewriters that I can't get around to typing on each one ever week, haha. So things like that happen.

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  8. I found one of these last weekend, which also had an immovable carriage as you have described. It was only later that I remembered this post. I didn't buy the 1620 because it's overall condition wasn't good, but I liked what I saw enough to want to find another one in a more pristine condition. :)

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