7 Sep 2013

Opening the Olive Green Corona Case

1943 Corona Standard Mill 3C 312420










Transcribed with my new Corona Standard Mill

19 comments:

  1. Ohhhhhhhh......
    Oliver green! I like it. I like it! Mmmmmmm jealous!

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    1. I wonder if Olivers were olive green based solely on their name. XD
      But yeah, they're really quite close in colour!

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  2. WOW YOU ARE ONE LUCKY TYPOSPHERIAN STOP

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  3. Wow, what a fantastic score! I love the olive green and the "C" of the typeface.

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  4. Great catch! The C is identical to one on a machine I have yet to introduce to the Typosphere. It has already made a G+ appearance.

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    1. Interesting, thanks for the info! It was your Underwood I mentioned, I just didn't want to say so here on blogger yet if you didn't want me to. XD

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    2. Yep! Who would have guessed an Underwood and a Corona could have this typeface anomaly in common?

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    3. It might have been Army spec then. Who knows?

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  5. Oh, that is an absolutely magnificent find - lucky you! The typeface is fantastic.

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  6. Great find! The Q looks magnificent too, but that C is just stunning.

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    1. You're right about the Q, and it's interesting how the style of the uppercase Q is really important to a typeface, yet we hardly get to see it in use! :(

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  7. The ''C' is similar to the vertical script style?

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  8. Congratulations on the great find!
    *mega jealous*
    The typeface is intriguing, so very intriguing!

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    Replies
    1. Intriguing is probably the best word for it. XD It is so contradictory!

      ...and really amazing anyway.

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  9. VERY NICE! AND I HAPPEN TO HAVE THE SAME MODEL - SEE YOU SOON IN THE TYPOSPHERE!

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  10. Wonderful find, and wonderful machine. Thanks for sharing!

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  11. Best guess on those waywardly expressive characters is that they are ornamented to differentiate them more clearly from similar letters. There's no way you could be confused between a C and a G, or a mis-typed O. Similarly, the 8 and the & are distinguishable like the others from their near neighbours. After all, you wouldn't want to call an air strike (or whatever) on the basis of a misunderstood missive. So, the tails may be the written equivalent of emphatic letter endings the same way a radio speaker might speak the number nine as "niner", etc. Eliminating confusion in times of stress.

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    1. I had some vague idea in that direction, but I was prematurely thrown off by the Navy Mill typeface being much less quirky.

      http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-2ZAid8GWdIU/TrSyprU2IPI/AAAAAAAAA0k/Jgr3e208xPg/s640/IMG_2607.jpg

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